War and battle hammers

A war hammer is a late medieval weapon of war intended for close combat action, the design of which resembles the hammer. The war hammer consists of a handle and a head. The handle may be of different lengths, the longest being roughly equivalent to the halberd, and the shortest about the same as a mace. Long war hammers were pole weapons (polearms) meant for use against riders, whereas short ones were used in closer quarters and from horseback. Later war hammers often had a spike on one side of the head, thus making it a more versatile weapon.

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Gothic war hammer

Gothic war hammer

Detail 105,00 € In stock

Heavy War Mallet

Heavy War Mallet

Detail 120,00 € In stock

War Hammer

War Hammer

Detail 124,00 € In stock

Horseman's war hammer

Horseman's war hammer

Detail 155,00 € In stock

German War Hammer

German War Hammer

Detail 74,00 € 2 Weeks

War hammer

War hammer

Detail 113,00 € 5 Weeks

War hammer

War hammer

Detail 113,00 € 2 Weeks

War hammer

War hammer

Detail 113,00 € 2 Weeks

Horseman's Pick Hammer

Horseman's Pick Hammer

Detail 114,00 € 16 Weeks

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War hammers

War hammers were developed as a consequence of the ever more prevalent surface-hardened steel surfacing of wrought iron armours of the late medieval battlefields during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The surface of the armour was now as hard as the edge of a blade, so a blade tended to ricochet. Swords, or the blade of a battleaxe, were likely only to give a glancing blow, losing much of the impact, especially on the high curvature of the helmet. The war hammer could deliver the full force to the target.

Advisory Service: Questions and Answers

How and what materials are your daggers made from?

The daggers are approximately made as follows. The basic shape of the blade is made by a laser CNC machine. It is burned from spring steel. The semi-finished blade follows then in the groove cutter, where the cutting edge and the groove are milled. The blade is then oil-quenched and tempered to the desired hardness. Then the guard and pommel is attached to the blade tang. The tang is usually peened at the end (behind the pommel) and the cross-guard hard soldered with brass. Hardwood plates are placed under the handle wrapping from genuine cowhide so that the handle is sufficiently robust for a safe grasp. The steels surfaces obtain the desired finish in the end - with a wire brush or with a felt disc with polishing paste.

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