Dirk daggers

Dirk is a Scots word for a short dagger; sometimes a cut-down sword blade mounted on a dagger hilt, rather than a knife blade. Scottish dirk daggers are a traditional accessory worn with the kilt as a part of full Highland dress for formal occasions. The Scottish dirk dagger evolved from an earlier type of weapon known as a Bollock dagger. Many Scottish dirks carry a smaller knife and fork which fit into compartments on the front of the sheath.

Dirk dagger

The hilts of Scottish dirk daggers are traditionally carved from dark colored wood such as bog oak or ebony. Scottish dirks are often lavishly decorated with silver mounts and have pommels set with cairngorm stones. The blades of most Scottish dirks measure 12" in length and are single edged with decorative file work known as "jimping" on the unsharpened back edge of the blade. When worn, the dirk normally hangs by a leather strap known as a "frog" from a dirk belt, which is a wide leather belt having a large, usually ornate buckle, that is worn around the waist with a kilt.

Advisory Service: Questions and Answers

What is the difference between industrially rolled and hand-forged blade?

In the case of hand-forged blade our blacksmith takes the already rolled spring steel and forges it with hand on the anvil or under the monkey (drop hammer). By forging becomes the steel more compacted (denser). Industrially rolled spring steel blades are made by cutting steel plate into strips under drop shears. Then they are ground or milled/grooved and without further forging directly put into the annealing furnace and hardened in oil bath. The qualities of both kinds of blades do not differ from each other much since the industrial rolling is already very good. On forged blades usually have forge traces, which give them an authentic and unique look.

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