Shield with Coat of Arms

A coat of arms shield is a shield with distinctive heraldic design on a tunic used to cover and protect armour, but the term is more broadly applied to mean a full heraldic achievement which consists of a shield and certain accessories. In either sense, the design is a symbol unique to a person, family, corporation, or state. Such displays are also commonly called armorial bearings, armorial devices, heraldic devices, or arms.

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Shield with Coat of Arms

Historically, armorial bearings were first used by feudal lords and knights in the mid-12th century on battlefields as a way to identify allied from enemy soldiers. As the uses for heraldic designs expanded, other social classes who never would march in battle began to assume arms for themselves. Initially, those closest to the lords and knights adopted arms, such as persons employed as squires that would be in common contact with the armorial devices. Then priests and other ecclesiastical dignities adopted coats of arms, usually to be used as seals and other such insignia, and then towns and cities to likewise seal and authenticate documents. Eventually by the mid-13th century, peasants, commoners and burghers were adopting heraldic devices. The widespread assumption of arms led some states to regulate heraldry within their borders. However, in most of continental Europe, citizens freely adopted armorial bearings.

Advisory Service: Questions and Answers

Why you cannot deliver swords or daggers to Switzerland?

Dear customers from Switzerland, we are very sorry that we cannot deliver swords, daggers, sabres, maces, combat axes, flails etc. to your country. We meet with bureaucratic obstacles at all products that either are or just look as a weapon again and again. We receive all consignments to Switzerland automatically back with an explanation "subject to the import permit." Our logistics partners told us the following: "both goods that are sold only to persons over 18 years and goods that merely look as weapons are subject to import permit. (For example: toy guns are sellable without restrictions in Switzerland, BUT are subject to import permit issued by the Swiss authorities!)". We have found only the following solutions so far: (1) The customer secures collection at our address in the Czech Republic himself (his logistic partner can handle this procedure better), (2) the customer gives us a delivery address in the EU. The disadvantage is that we have to charge the VAT tax in both cases.

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